Finding Grace in Discipleship

scott-szarapka-lmyzcIBAJs4-unsplash.jpg

A few weeks ago, Pastor Ron challenged us at City Chapel to take the next right step toward discipleship. Whether that was meeting new people who hold a similar interest as us (i.e. a book club or gaming club) or coming up with an “elevator speech” (my words, not his) regarding why we believe what we believe so we can be ready to share it at any time.

Since he voiced that second option during his sermon, I knew it was one I had to work on. But it freaked me out then and it still freaks me out now. As someone who communicates/writes for a living, you would think words might come easy --especially when it really matters. But, since that Sunday, whenever I try to think through the right words to express what I believe, I freeze. My brain puts up a wall. It’s a mix of not having the words and the fear of saying the wrong words. Or, quite frankly, not having the answer to a hard question and looking like a fool. 

As I’ve taken writing classes and practiced different forms of communication for a variety of audiences, I've learned over and over again that communication, even about simple things and concepts, can be really hard. So, it’s no wonder that having the right words to express something like your whole faith foundation is hard--especially in a sentence or two. 


All this is to say, Ron’s challenge hit me hard. And maybe you felt that way, too. Through a lens of good communication, expressing something so important to me is going to take trial and error and learning. It's going to take grace. At some point, I have to use whatever words God gives me to share my “why” for following Him. And sometimes that might mean not using words at all. 

If your elevator speech is bright, shiny, and polished--great work (send any pointers my way!). If it still needs some tweaking (or even a first draft), know that you’re not alone. The beautiful part of a faith community is being able to walk this road together, one bumpy sentence at a time, in hopes that we will all become better communicators for Christ.


Written by Kelli Gilmore